Category Archive: contemporary fiction

PIECES OF A PUZZLE: ‘Tangram’ by Juan Carlos Márquez, trans. by James Womack

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Juan Carlos Márquez, Tangram, translated by James Womack (Nevsky Books, 2017) By Ellen Jones Juan Carlos Márquez’s latest book is organised according to the eponymous tangram, a puzzle made up of seven flat shapes… Continue reading

A TROUBLING TRANSFORMATION: A. Igoni Barrett’s ‘Blackass’

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A. Igoni Barrett, Blackass (Graywolf Press, 2016) By Timothy Ogene The line of connection between A. Igoni Barrett’s Blackass and Kafka’s Metamorphosis is not hard to trace. It is established at the very beginning… Continue reading

TO TRY OR NOT TO TRY: ‘Lunatics, Lovers and Poets: Twelve Stories After Cervantes and Shakespeare’

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Daniel Hahn and Margarita Valencia (eds.), Lunatics, Lovers and Poets: Twelve Stories After Cervantes and Shakespeare (And Other Stories, 2016) By Edmund Chapman 2016 marked the four hundredth anniversary of one of the most extraordinary… Continue reading

‘CRUDE WORDS’: Creating an anthology of contemporary Venezuelan writing

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Crude Words: Contemporary Writing from Venezuela, edited by Montague Kobbé, Katie Brown and Tim Girven (Ragpicker Press, 2016) By Katie Brown, with an introduction by Rebecca DeWald “Venezuelan literature?” you say? For many… Continue reading

SEXY, EXISTENTIAL, COOL: April Ayers Lawson’s ‘Virgin and Other Stories’

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April Ayers Lawson Virgin and Other Stories (Granta Books, 2017) By Laura Waddell Like a sinewy muscle, April Ayer Lawson’s debut short story collection Virgin and Other Stories flexes a visceral grace. The heady themes… Continue reading

JUAN PABLO VILLALOBOS’ TRAGIC SURREALISM: ‘I’ll Sell You a Dog’

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Juan Pablo Villalobos, I’ll Sell You a Dog, translated by Rosalind Harvey (And Other Stories, 2016) By Ailsa Peate Mexico has recently been in the spotlight internationally thanks, mainly, to celebrities – in a… Continue reading

BRECHT AND MAM: Anakana Schofield’s ‘Martin John’

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Anakana Schofield Martin John (And Other Stories, 2016) By Xenobe Purvis Consider this: never in Nabokov’s Lolita do we actually meet Humbert Humbert’s mother. She is mentioned briefly on the second page; “My very photogenic… Continue reading

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